The Cambridge classical journal - CCJ

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Klassische Philologie
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The Cambridge classical journal - CCJ

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THE PROLOGUE OF VALERIUS FLACCUS’ ARGONAUTICA (1.1–21): QUINDECIMVIRATE, CORTINA AND CALEDONIAN SEA
This paper challenges certain more or less standard interpretations of Valerius Flaccus’ Argonautica prologue, viz. that lines 5–9 reveal that the poet was a xvvir sacris faciundis, that the cortina (6) stood in or in front of his house to symbolise his quindecimvirate, and that Caledonius … ; Oceanus (8–9) refers to an exploit of Vespasian during the Claudian invasion of Britain. I argue that Valerius’ quindecimvirate is a mirage, that the cortina stood in a different ‘house’, and that ‘Caledonian Ocean’ refers to an event or events closer in time to the composition of the Argonautica. The alternative interpretations proposed radically alter perceptions of the prologue.
CCJ volume 65 Cover and Front matter
Article URL: https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/057303802258F2A2719BB19B2B9F7D4A
Citation: Vol 65 (2019) pp f1 f3
Publication Date: 2019-12-01T00:00:00.000Z
Journal: Cambridge Classical Journal
CCJ volume 65 Cover and Back matter
Article URL: https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/B9DDE2E66D002E18787E98B0D330BC37
Citation: Vol 65 (2019) pp b1 b5
Publication Date: 2019-12-01T00:00:00.000Z
Journal: Cambridge Classical Journal
CROESUS’ GREAT NEMESIS
This article attempts to account for the fact that nemesis occurs only once in Herodotus. It connects the term to Phrygia and the importance of Nemesis there, esp. as seen in ‘confession-inscriptions’ (Beichtinschriften). It argues that the Atys-Adrastus story is meant as an interpretative guide to the rest of the History through its use of significant names, comparable to the use of significant names in the Old Testament.
KNOWLEDGE, SUFFERING AND THE PERFORMANCE OF WISDOM IN SOLON'S ELEGY TO THE MUSES AND THE BABYLONIAN POEM OF THE RIGHTEOUS SUFFERER
This article offers a comparative reading of Solon's Elegy to the Muses (fragment 13 West) and the Babylonian Poem of the Righteous Sufferer, focusing on the interplay of literary form and theological content. It argues that in both poems, shifts in the identity and perspective of the poetic voice enable the speaker to act out, or perform, a particular vision of humanity and its relationship with the divine. The comparative analysis improves our understanding of both texts, showing for instance that Solon's elegy is a highly sophisticated attempt to articulate a coherent vision of divine justice and the human condition. It also sheds light on the particular modes in which ancient literature and theology interact in different contexts, and how this interaction could affect audiences.
INCREDVLVS ODI: HORACE AND THE SUBLITERARY AESTHETIC OF THE AUGUSTAN STAGE
Starting from the comparative standpoint of elite hostility to nineteenth-century British melodrama, this article posits pantomime's ‘melodramatic’ mode of exhibitionist excess as one of the missing links in the landscape against which Horace composed his Ars poetica. It suggests that lines 182–8 of the Ars that disapprove the display of death, violence and physical impossibilities on the tragic stage may be better understood as Horace's hostile response to pantomime's increasing prominence in Roman theatrical life, more precisely to the dislocation of ‘horror’ and ‘marvel’ from the realm of the ‘heard’ to that of the ‘seen’ favoured by the pantomime genre.
CASTING A NEW CANON: COLLECTING AND TREATING CASTS OF GREEK AND ROMAN SCULPTURE, 1850–1939
From the mid-nineteenth century, it became de rigueur for Classics Departments to acquire casts of Greek and Roman sculpture to form reference and experimental collections. Recent scholarship has revived such casts, investigating their role as instruments of teaching and research, and their wavering popularity. This paper further examines the aims of those responsible for collecting casts, and discusses how these objectives influenced their materiality and treatment, as well as showing how the de facto creation of a new canon of casts through their repetition across the collections of different institutions contributed to the decline in their perceived importance.
SCHOOLS, READING AND POETRY IN THE EARLY GREEK WORLD
This essay explores the practices through which a thin stratum of society acquired deep experience with written literature in the early Greek world. Combining a pessimistic view about the popularity of schools with an optimistic view about the stability of institutional patterns, I argue that from an early date elite ideology valorised education through the intensive study of certain written texts. Schools thus worked to institutionalise an enduring and important connection between economic capital and cultural capital acquired through reading and performing poetry. It was in the Classical period, if not before, that the interconnected practices of literate education and literary reading acquired their distinctive social character. Fully understanding the complex interface between orality and literacy in the early Greek world entails understanding some highly literate subcultures on their own terms.
THE VENTRIS–CHADWICK CORRESPONDENCE AND THE DECIPHERMENT OF LINEAR B: A DENIER, A DISSENTER AND A DUBIOUS CONCLUSION
The correspondence between Michael Ventris and John Chadwick, housed in the Mycenaean Epigraphy Room in the Faculty of Classics, Cambridge, provides valuable insights into the decipherment of Linear B and the collaboration between the two men which produced first ‘Evidence for Greek dialect in the Mycenaean archives’ (Ventris and Chadwick (1953)) and then Documents in Mycenaean Greek (Ventris and Chadwick (1956)). The letters also reveal interesting information about the relationship between Ventris and Chadwick and other scholars of the day. This article examines their relationship with Arthur Beattie, who never accepted the decipherment, and Leonard R. Palmer, who disagreed fundamentally with many of their interpretations of the texts. A file of correspondence containing letters from 1956, discovered only after the publication of Andrew Robinson's biography of Ventris (Robinson (2002)), casts doubt on the conclusion that, perhaps in part owing to difficulties with Palmer, Ventris had lost interest in Linear B immediately before his death.
SPECIES OF AMBIGUITY IN SEMONIDES FR. 7
This paper looks at the structure of Semonides’ catalogue in fragment 7, and at the metaphors that underpin it. There is a tension between the organising function of this catalogue and the hybrid entities it lists. It is suggested that the opening and closing lines frame the catalogue conceptually, exploiting ambiguities in the words χωρίς, γένος and φῦλον. Not only does Semonides play with ideas of order and embrace ambiguities of language, but he suggests that these are a feature of his poetic inheritance: the female types of his catalogue are a collection of hybrids assembled from a variety of Archaic texts and traditions.
CCJ volume 64 Cover and Front matter
Article URL: https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/3171443747C33062A8EF9B8924B88FD6
Citation: Vol 64 (2018) pp f1 f3
Publication Date: 2018-12-01T00:00:00.000Z
Journal: Cambridge Classical Journal
CCJ volume 64 Cover and Back matter
Article URL: https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/52D61FD24D40EE776510227778E46789
Citation: Vol 64 (2018) pp b1 b5
Publication Date: 2018-12-01T00:00:00.000Z
Journal: Cambridge Classical Journal
THE VIEW FROM THE MOUNTAIN (OROSKOPIA) IN GREEK AND LATIN LITERATURE
This paper argues for the existence of the topos of oroskopia in Greek and Latin literature. Gods and mortals are positioned on mountains to watch events or landscapes below. The view from above symbolises power (in the case of the gods) or an attempt at control or desire for power (in the case of mortals). It may also suggest an agreeable and relaxed spectatorship with no active involvement in the events watched, which may metaphorically morph into a historian's objectivity or a philosopher's emotional tranquillity. The elevated position may also have a temporal aspect, gods looking into the future or mortals looking back on their life.
TROUBLE AT SEA IN JUVENAL 12, PERSIUS 6 AND THE PROEM TO LUCRETIUS, DE RERUM NATURA 2
This paper argues that the shipwreck scene in Juvenal 12 should be read as another exploration of the satiric ‘sketch’ offered in the proem to Lucretius, De rerum natura 2: a thematic response to and exploration of the scene of troubles at sea in the Lucretian proem. The beleaguered sea-merchant Catullus should not have gone sailing at all – but he responds to trouble as an Epicurean would recommend. Juvenal 12 displays Epicurean conceptions of friendship and sacrifice, and an allusion to a storm scene in Persius 6 (itself intertextually connected to Lucretius’ proem) confirms the satiric importance of Lucretius in Juvenal's passage.
HOMERIC MOTIVATION AND MODERN NARRATOLOGY: THE CASE OF PENELOPE
Forged mostly in readings of the modern novel, the tools of narratology have allowed us to detect many features that ancient literature shares with modern texts. At the same time, they have detracted from crucial differences between ancient and modern narratives. This article argues that, while being at the origin of the classical western plot, the Odyssey also features a narrative logic that differs significantly from what the modern novel has taught us to expect. It focuses on the case of Penelope. Various theories have been advanced to explain Penelope's intervention in books 18 and 19. The difficulties that modern scholars have had with Penelope, it is suggested, are due to a special kind of motivation which is also prominent in medieval narrative.
JUSTIFYING THE WORLD AS AN AESTHETIC PHENOMENON
This article scrutinises one of the most challenging theses of Nietzsche's Birth of Tragedy, that only as an aesthetic phenomenon can existence and the world be (or appear to be) ‘justified’. Through a close examination of the work's frequently masked revaluation of a series of Greek sources of thinking, not least its ‘inversion’ of both the metaphysics and the aesthetics of Plato's Republic, the article shows how the thesis of aesthetic ‘justification’ is caught up in a tension between Apolline and Dionysian interpretations, the first entailing a quasi-Homeric sense that the Olympians justify human existence by living a transfigured form of it themselves, the second involving a tragic insight into reality as itself the creative work of a ‘world-artist’, the latter allusively associated by Nietzsche with the philosophy of Heraclitus.
THE ROMAN ARMY AND GREEK MILITARISM IN CHARITON'S CHAEREAS AND CALLIRHOE
This paper seeks to highlight and assess the presence of allusions to Roman military apparatus in Chariton's Chaereas and Callirhoe. In the introduction, I contextualise the argument within the history of scholarship on the novel, and discuss issues relating to the author's date, Aphrodisian provenance and readership. I then divide the argument into three parts. At the end of the novel, Chaereas returns to Syracuse and publicly displays the spoils won from the east in a manner that, I argue, is highly suggestive of the Roman triumph (Part i). He then extends a grant of citizenship to the Greek element of his army and issues them cash donatives, while Hermocrates gives farmland to the Egyptians. As I demonstrate, this is characteristic of what happens upon the demobilisation of Roman military manpower (especially the auxilia) (Part ii). I then draw out the ramifications of an imperial-era author who represents Greek military exploits against the Persians, writing during a period in which Greeks were not interested in military endeavours (Part iii).
FROM ΚΕΙΝΟΣ TO ΟΔΕ: DEIXIS AND IDENTITY IN THE ODYSSEY
Scholarship on Homer's Odyssey has long recognised the importance of naming and reference in the poem, particularly in the way speakers refer to Odysseus. Here I consider one term regularly used for the protagonist, but largely overlooked in these studies: κεῖνος, ‘that man’. I argue that it acquires a specific and rich association with Odysseus in the epic, one that depends on the deictic properties of the pronoun as marking its object as distant in space and uncertainly located. This is contrasted with Odysseus’ use of the proximal deictic ὅδε, ‘this man’, to reveal his identity at the poem's climax.
COMMENTING ON PINDAR, OLYMPIAN 2: THE EMMENID GENEALOGIES
The article examines the two different genealogies of the Emmenids reported by the scholia on Pindar's Olympian 2: scholl. 16c ~ 70f Dr. connect Theron to the Labdacids Thersander and Polynices via Thera (the ‘Therean’ genealogy), whereas 82d Dr. links him with Eteocles via Rhodes (the ‘Rhodian’ genealogy). Modern interpretations associate the former with the Epinician, the latter with the Encomium to Theron. By contrast, it is argued that the ‘Therean’ genealogy originated from an ancient mistaken interpretation of the role of Thersander in Ol. 2.43–7: a careful reading of that passage and of relevant testimonia shows that Pindar endorsed the ‘Rhodian’ version in both poems, thus showing a unanimous tradition.
STYLE AND PERSONHOOD: THE CASE OF THE AMASIS PAINTER
For archaeologists discussion of style is unavoidable. Within classical archaeology ‘style’ is closely associated with connoisseurship as practised by J. D. Beazley. Style identifies individuals, artistic personalities such as the Amasis Painter. This notion of style necessarily overlaps with another debate within both anthropology and prehistoric archaeology (personhood) which also touches on an older discussion within classical studies. These two debates have remained strangers to each other. The article explores these issues in relation to the iconography of hares and arming scenes. Notions of personhood and agency force us to re-evaluate such iconography and its effectiveness as narrative.
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